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JRFB Chair’s Letter on Future Proposals and RFI

JOIDES Resolution Facility Board, 26 February 2021
Dear IODP Community,
I am briefly following up on my 5 January 2021 letter to you to make a couple of clarifications and a request of everyone.
It would appear there is some confusion about submission of proposals that would use the JR. Beginning with the 1 April 2021 deadline, we will not be accepting any new proposals addressing the current Science Plan. There are exceptions that were noted in my earlier letter, such as the new Land-2-Sea proposals, as well as those proposals reviewed by the SEP in 2020 that were deactivated but where the proponents were encouraged to re-submit. Revisions to proposals already in the system and Ancillary Project Letters will be also be accepted. I need to clearly explain why this action has been taken. Basically, we do not want to waste the community’s time because the lack of drilling in 2020 and now into 2021 means we have an overabundance of proposals at the JRFB and SEP to see the current program out through 2023, even with the option year to continue into 2024:

Currently at the JRFB there are in the Atlantic 14 proposals to schedule, 8 postponed expeditions, and 2 proposals in the holding bin. This is just for the Atlantic;
Also at the JRFB are 6 expeditions with orphan sites outside the Atlantic;
In addition, 18 proposals outside of the Atlantic are at the JRFB to schedule. Admittedly, some of these proposals will need to be revisited (I count ~8), but this still leaves 10 proposals at the JRFB;
At SEP, there are currently FORTY (40+) proposals seeking to use the JR.

It is unlikely we will be able to drill all of these and we will be deciding how to handle proposals that remain undrilled at the end of the current program at the 23-25 June 2021 JRFB meeting.
The next issue I would like to discuss is the Request for Information (RFI). Marta Torres (USAC Chair) and I have highlighted the importance of this RFI and we need you to complete this, no matter your country of origin. The data contained will inform how we implement the 2050 Science Framework, including the JRFB Working Group and the quest for a new U.S. scientific ocean drilling vessel. We need an overwhelming response to this to show continued community support for the Framework and getting a new U.S. drilling vessel.
Please take 5-10 minutes to fill out the RFI – it is important: https://proposals.iodp.org/index.php/site/login.
When will we be in a position to accept proposals addressing the 2050 Science Framework? The JRFB Working Group, led by Ken Miller, is looking at various proposal submission aspects and will deliver a report with recommendations to the JRFB at the June meeting. NSF has released the “Dear Colleague Letter: Request for Expression of Interest Regarding Provision of a Drilling Vessel to Support Future International Scientific Ocean Discovery”. As I stated above, the results from the RFI will feed into the planning for this new vessel (so please fill out the RFI!). Once the results of the DCL and RFI have been collated and the JRFB WG has submitted its recommendations, we will be in a much better position to determine when and how we can accept proposals for the Framework.
Finally, as noted in the 18 February letter from USAC Chair, Marta Torres, USAC and USSSP plan to organize two Community Town Hall meetings in the next several months. These will be conducted via Zoom and their goals are to provide attendees with information on the latest and rapidly changing developments within scientific ocean drilling, and offer an opportunity to ask questions and hopefully get some answers! Watch for the USSSP emails for more details in the near future.
In closing, the planning for the next phase of scientific ocean drilling is underway. Because of the innovative nature of the 2050 Science Framework, we have to implement it correctly, which requires deliberate and careful planning. Thank you for your patience and you will receive regular updates from the JRFB as the process progresses. Please feel free to contact me with any issues/suggestions/concerns.
Sincerely yours,
Clive R. NealChair, JOIDES Resolution Facility Board(neal.1@nd.edu)

ArcOP – A novel scientific ocean drilling expedition to be conducted in 2022

ArcOP – A novel scientific ocean drilling expedition to explore Arctic Ocean paleoceanography and climate
We are pleased to announce that the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD),the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and Arctic Marine Solutions (AMS)will jointly conduct an expedition of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), focused on the Arctic Ocean – a key location in global climate change.
The ArcOP Expedition will be conducted in August and September 2022by the ECORD Science Operator (ESO) in close collaboration with SPRS and AMS.

Tracking Arctic climate change from a Greenhouseto an Icehouse world
Science behind the ArcOP Expedition
The Arctic Ocean is a very sensitive and important region for global climate change, and is unique in comparison to the other oceans on Earth. Due to complex feedback processes (collectively known as “Arctic amplification”), the Arctic is both a contributor to climate change and a region that is most affected by global warming.
Despite this global importance, the Arctic Ocean is the last major region on Earth where the long-term climate history remains poorly known. Major advances in understanding were achieved in 2004 with the successful completion of IODP Expedition 302: Arctic Coring Expedition – ACEX implemented by ECORD, marking the start of a new era in Arctic climate exploration.
The ArcOP expedition will represent another step-change in reconstructing the detailed history of climate change in the central Arctic Ocean over the last 50 million years. ArcOP will explore a critical time interval spanning the period when prominent changes in global climate took place, during the transition from the early Cenozoic Greenhouse world to the late Cenozoic Icehouse world.
An international team of scientists, led by the Co-chief Scientists Prof. Ruediger Stein (MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, Germany) and Prof. Kristen St. John (Dept. of Geology and Environmental Science, James Madison University, USA), will collect about 900 m of sediment cores at two sites along the Lomonosov Ridge. The expedition will last for about seven weeks offshore and will be followed by intensive investigation and sampling of the cores onshore to unlock their climate secrets.

“A complete Cenozoic Arctic climate record is needed to assess the sensitivity of the Earth‘s climate system to changes of different forcing parameters (e.g. CO2). Precise knowledge of past rates and scales of climate change under conditions very different from the modern climate are important to separate natural and anthropogenic forcings and will enable us to further increase the reliability of prediction of future climate change.”
Prof. Ruediger Stein, ArcOP Co-chief Scientist

“We anticipate that the sedimentary record that the Arc-OP expedition is targeting will provide critical puzzle pieces enabling the scientific community to better understand the drivers, feedbacks, consequences, and varying rates of Cenozoic climate change at both regional and global scales.”
Prof. Kristen St. John, ArcOP Co-chief Scientist

 
A joint international initiative
The ArcOP Expedition will be conducted in August and September 2022 by the ECORD Science Operator (ESO) in close collaboration with SPRS and AMS.
ArcOP is a unique and challenging expedition. A fleet composed of a scientific drillship supported by two icebreakers will be used to make drilling possible in this permanently ice-covered region. Such a multi-vessel approach was employed by ECORD for the first time during the ACEX Expedition in 2004.
The selection of potential ArcOP sites is strongly based on site-survey expeditions led by the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Sciences Bremerhaven, carried out with RV Polarstern in 2008, 2014 and 2018.

“Scientific treasures that are essential for understanding Earth system processes are buried beneath the ocean floor and can be accessed only through ocean drilling. Many of these archives that open windows into the Past have not been recovered yet, especially due to technological limitations. Over the last 16 years, ECORD has gone where no scientific drilling project has gone before and has systematically pushed the boundaries of the longstanding and highly successful international scientific ocean drilling programmes. The ArcOP expedition represents a unique collaborative model, which is now needed to achieve ambitious and high-profile scientific projects.”
Dr. Gilbert Camoin, Director of ECORD Managing Agency

 

“Swedish marine-based polar research has played an international leading role in recent decades, and the secretariat has extensive experience in organising complex field operations. We are pleased with being entrusted, together with ECORD, to coordinate an expedition with such great scientific significance when it comes to understanding climate change.”
Katarina Gårdfeldt, Director-General of the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat

 

“ArcOP will involve scientific marine operations under challenging ice and weather conditions in the high Arctic on the Lomonosov Ridge (81.4°N, 140°E), one of the remotest parts of the world. Arctic Marine Solutions AB is proud to have been selected as an operating partner in this pioneering scientific expedition, with responsibility for core-drilling and Fleet/Ice Management. This ground-breaking project will highlight the application of best practice in polar operations and the importance of a collaborative approach to maritime safety.”
Åke Rohlén, Chairman Arctic Marine Solutions AB

  

More information:
Expedition 377 Arctic Ocean Paleoceanography (ArcOP):https://www.ecord.org/expedition377
Download official Press Release:

English
Polish

French
Swedish

German
 

 

About the research programme: http://www.iodp.org/
About the European part of the programme: https://www.ecord.org/
About ECORD Science Operator (ESO): https://www.ecord.org/about-ecord/management-structure/eso/
About the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS): https://polar.se/
About Arctic Marine Solutions (AMS): https://arcticmarinesolutions.se/

Contact / interviews / images

Dave McInroyECORD Science OperatorBritish Geological SurveyEmail: dbm@bgs.ac.ukPhone: +44 7792 565 801
Gilbert CamoinDirector of the ECORD Managing AgencyEuropean Centre for Research and Teaching in Environmental Geoscience (CEREGE)Email: camoin@cerege.frPhone: +33 688 12 08 95
Ulrike PrangeECORD Science OperatorMARUM – Center for Marine Environmental SciencesUniversity of BremenEmail: uprange@marum.dePhone: +49 421 218-65540
Åke RohlénChairman of Arctic Marine Solutions ABEmail: ake.rohlen@arcticmarinesolutions.sePhone: +46 702 877424
Katarina GårdfeldtDirector-General of Swedish Polar Research SecretariatEmail: mkatarina.gardfeldt@polar.sePhone: +46 72 517 07 78

Photo: Helicopter view of three vessels during IODP Expedition 302: Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) in 2004. Credits: P. Frejvall, AMS

ArcOP – A novel scientific ocean drilling expedition to be conducted in 2022

ArcOP – A novel scientific ocean drilling expedition to explore Arctic Ocean paleoceanography and climate
We are pleased to announce that the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD),the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and Arctic Marine Solutions (AMS)will jointly conduct an expedition of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), focused on the Arctic Ocean – a key location in global climate change.
The ArcOP Expedition will be conducted in August and September 2022by the ECORD Science Operator (ESO) in close collaboration with SPRS and AMS.

Tracking Arctic climate change from a Greenhouse to an Icehouse world
Science behind the ArcOP Expedition
The Arctic Ocean is a very sensitive and important region for global climate change, and is unique in comparison to the other oceans on Earth. Due to complex feedback processes (collectively known as “Arctic amplification”), the Arctic is both a contributor to climate change and a region that is most affected by global warming.
Despite this global importance, the Arctic Ocean is the last major region on Earth where the long-term climate history remains poorly known. Major advances in understanding were achieved in 2004 with the successful completion of IODP Expedition 302: Arctic Coring Expedition – ACEX implemented by ECORD, marking the start of a new era in Arctic climate exploration.
The ArcOP expedition will represent another step-change in reconstructing the detailed history of climate change in the central Arctic Ocean over the last 50 million years. ArcOP will explore a critical time interval spanning the period when prominent changes in global climate took place, during the transition from the early Cenozoic Greenhouse world to the late Cenozoic Icehouse world.
An international team of scientists, led by the Co-chief Scientists Prof. Ruediger Stein (MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, Germany) and Prof. Kristen St. John (Dept. of Geology and Environmental Science, James Madison University, USA), will collect about 900 m of sediment cores at two sites along the Lomonosov Ridge. The expedition will last for about seven weeks offshore and will be followed by intensive investigation and sampling of the cores onshore to unlock their climate secrets.

“A complete Cenozoic Arctic climate record is needed to assess the sensitivity of the Earth‘s climate system to changes of different forcing parameters (e.g. CO2). Precise knowledge of past rates and scales of climate change under conditions very different from the modern climate are important to separate natural and anthropogenic forcings and will enable us to further increase the reliability of prediction of future climate change.”
Prof. Ruediger Stein, ArcOP Co-chief Scientist

“We anticipate that the sedimentary record that the Arc-OP expedition is targeting will provide critical puzzle pieces enabling the scientific community to better understand the drivers, feedbacks, consequences, and varying rates of Cenozoic climate change at both regional and global scales.”
Prof. Kristen St. John, ArcOP Co-chief Scientist

 
A joint international initiative
The ArcOP Expedition will be conducted in August and September 2022 by the ECORD Science Operator (ESO) in close collaboration with SPRS and AMS.
ArcOP is a unique and challenging expedition. A fleet composed of a scientific drillship supported by two icebreakers will be used to make drilling possible in this permanently ice-covered region. Such a multi-vessel approach was employed by ECORD for the first time during the ACEX Expedition in 2004.
The selection of potential ArcOP sites is strongly based on site-survey expeditions led by the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Sciences Bremerhaven, carried out with RV Polarstern in 2008, 2014 and 2018.

“Scientific treasures that are essential for understanding Earth system processes are buried beneath the ocean floor and can be accessed only through ocean drilling. Many of these archives that open windows into the Past have not been recovered yet, especially due to technological limitations. Over the last 16 years, ECORD has gone where no scientific drilling project has gone before and has systematically pushed the boundaries of the longstanding and highly successful international scientific ocean drilling programmes. The ArcOP expedition represents a unique collaborative model, which is now needed to achieve ambitious and high-profile scientific projects.”
Dr. Gilbert Camoin, Director of ECORD Managing Agency

 

“Swedish marine-based polar research has played an international leading role in recent decades, and the secretariat has extensive experience in organising complex field operations. We are pleased with being entrusted, together with ECORD, to coordinate an expedition with such great scientific significance when it comes to understanding climate change.”
Katarina Gårdfeldt, Director-General of the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat

 

“ArcOP will involve scientific marine operations under challenging ice and weather conditions in the high Arctic on the Lomonosov Ridge (81.4°N, 140°E), one of the remotest parts of the world. Arctic Marine Solutions AB is proud to have been selected as an operating partner in this pioneering scientific expedition, with responsibility for core-drilling and Fleet/Ice Management. This ground-breaking project will highlight the application of best practice in polar operations and the importance of a collaborative approach to maritime safety.”
Åke Rohlén, Chairman Arctic Marine Solutions AB

  

More information:
Expedition 377 Arctic Ocean Paleoceanography (ArcOP):https://www.ecord.org/expedition377
Download official Press Release:

English
Polish

French
Swedish

German
 

 

About the research programme: http://www.iodp.org/
About the European part of the programme: https://www.ecord.org/
About ECORD Science Operator (ESO): https://www.ecord.org/about-ecord/management-structure/eso/
About the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS): https://polar.se/
About Arctic Marine Solutions (AMS): https://arcticmarinesolutions.se/

Contact / interviews / images

Dave McInroyECORD Science OperatorBritish Geological SurveyEmail: dbm@bgs.ac.ukPhone: +44 7792 565 801
Gilbert CamoinDirector of the ECORD Managing AgencyEuropean Centre for Research and Teaching in Environmental Geoscience (CEREGE)Email: camoin@cerege.frPhone: +33 688 12 08 95
Ulrike PrangeECORD Science OperatorMARUM – Center for Marine Environmental SciencesUniversity of BremenEmail: uprange@marum.dePhone: +49 421 218-65540
Åke RohlénChairman of Arctic Marine Solutions ABEmail: ake.rohlen@arcticmarinesolutions.sePhone: +46 702 877424
Katarina GårdfeldtDirector-General of Swedish Polar Research SecretariatEmail: mkatarina.gardfeldt@polar.sePhone: +46 72 517 07 78

Photo: Helicopter view of three vessels during IODP Expedition 302: Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) in 2004. Credits: P. Frejvall, AMS

Applications to serve on IODP Science Evaluation Panel

Call for applications to serve as an ECORD member on the
Science Subgroup
of the
IODP Science Evaluation Panel
Deadline to apply: 26 March 2021
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) addresses fundamental questions about Earth’s climate, deep life, geodynamics, and geohazards and is driven by a flow of drilling proposals provided by the scientific community. The Science Evaluation Panel (SEP) is central to the success of IODP and is responsible for the evaluation and selection of the best and most relevant proposals, based on both scientific excellence and completeness and quality of the site survey data package. Externally reviewed, ready-to-drill proposals are then forwarded to the IODP Facility Boards for development of expedition schedules.
The European Consortium of Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) Science Support and Advisory Committee (ESSAC) is now accepting applications from active leading scientists in the field of marine geology and geophysics from ECORD member countries to fill three places on the Science Subgroup of SEP. The call is open to scientists with experience in relevant research fields from all ECORD Member Countries, but preference may be given to experts in geochemistry/petrology for one of the available places. Applications by female scientists especially welcome.
Responsibilities of Science Subgroup members on SEP include evaluating pre-proposals and full proposals, identifying pre-proposals to move forward towards full proposals, and declining those proposals unlikely to succeed. SEP also provides feedback to proponents regarding potential successful science and drilling strategies, and early guidance about necessary site characterization data.
The successful candidates are expected to attend two Science Evaluation Panel meetings per year (usually winter and summer) and to represent the interests of all ECORD countries. Appointments are normally for three years (six meetings). The first meeting to be attended by the new members will be held at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (La Jolla, USA), July 27-29, 2021 (or by Zoom, subject to the coronavirus situation in the summer).
Applications should be emailed to the ESSAC Office (essac@plymouth.ac.uk) by 26 March 2021. Provide a single PDF that includes: (i) a CV; (ii) a letter of interest including your specific expertise, previous involvement in DSDP/ODP/IODP expeditions or panels, and research interests; and (iii) a publication list.
Before applying please contact your national ESSAC delegate to confirm whether financial support is available for travel and subsistence costs associated with attending SEP meetings. When applying, please also send your delegate a copy of your application.
Useful links:
SEP: http://iodp.org/boards-and-panels/science-evaluation-panel
Facility Boards: http://iodp.org/facility-boards
IODP Science Plan: http://iodp.org/program-documents
ESSAC Delegates: http://www.ecord.org/about-ecord/management-structure/essac
For further information, please contact the ESSAC Office:
Antony Morris (ESSAC Chair)
Hanno Kinkel (ESSAC Science Coordinator) University of Plymouth
Email: essac@plymouth.ac.uk  http://www.ecord.org

Call for Proposals (Deadline: April 1, 2021) Request for Information (Open Now!)

Call for Proposals (Deadline: April 1, 2021)
Request for Information (Open Now!)

The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) explores Earth’s climate history,
structure, mantle/crust dynamics, natural hazards, and deep biosphere as described in
the IODP Science Plan . IODP facilitates international and interdisciplinary research on
transformative and societally relevant topics using the ocean drilling, coring, and
down-hole measurement facilities JOIDES Resolution , Chikyu , and Mission-Specific
Platforms (MSP).

This notice describes proposals that will be accepted for the April 1, 2021 deadline, as
well as the new request for information (RFI), which is open now.
Submission Information

Call for Proposals (Deadline: April 1, 2021)

JOIDES Resolution : The number of proposals, at all stages of development, currently in
the system for the JOIDES Resolution provide many high-quality options for scheduling
the ship through the end of the current program and into 2024; therefore, we are not
requesting new pre-proposals or full proposals. We will accept revisions to pre-proposals
and full proposals already in the system, new Ancillary Project Letters (APLs), new
Land-2-Sea proposals, and submission of proposals that were deactivated in 2020 with
an encouragement to revise and re-submit.

Mission-Specific Platforms: MSP expeditions are planned to operate once every other
year to recover core from targets that are inaccessible by the other facilities (e.g.,
shallow water, enclosed seas, ice-covered seas). MSP proposals for any ocean basin
are welcomed. Please note the new MSP proposal guidelines .

Chikyu : Completely new Chikyu riser proposals, other than Complementary Project
Proposals (CPPs), will not be accepted at this time.

Investigators are reminded that the interval from the first proposal submission to
expedition scheduling is on the order of 4-5 years due to the science and safety review
process and required lead time for scheduling, and that adequate site
characterization/site survey data are critical for success. Proponents are strongly
encouraged to contact the facility’s science operator to discuss platform-specific
operational and fiscal constraints before developing proposals.

Request for Information (Open Now!)

The JOIDES Resolution Facility Board (JRFB) is issuing a request for information (RFI)
to understand the international scientific community’s intent to propose to the 2050
Science Framework . Responses to the RFI will be considered by the JRFB in
consultation with the other Facility Boards, funding agencies, and the IODP Forum, and
they will inform planning on a potential future drilling program. Submissions to the RFI
require completing an online form in the Proposal Database System (PDB) that simply
asks about science goals that would be addressed by your future proposal, the region
that would be studied, and some additional planning information. Submission are being
accepted now and will continue until further notice. You may submit more than one
response.

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